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dmr [2019/12/26 17:38]
KD6KPC [What is a Talkgroup?]
dmr [2019/12/26 17:41] (current)
KD6KPC [What is a C-Bridge?]
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 DMR repeaters and networks incorporate a system of “talk groups.” These are simply an ID code transmitted by the radio, that is accepted by the repeater, and retransmitted to other DMR radios on the same channel, and potentially across the Internet to other linked systems. This ID code is a simple number like “310.” In the DMR world, 310 has been given the moniker of “Tac-310.” Any radio that is set to receive Tac-310 on that repeater’s frequency channel will open the speaker and allow the transmission to pass to the end user. Any other radio not monitoring Tac-310 will remain silent. These talk groups are programmed into radios like channels. A repeater could support multiple talk groups and the end-user radio would have to have each of these talk groups programmed into separate memory channels in order to utilize them. Memory slot one could be Tac-310, memory two could be Tac-311, and memory three could be Tac-312, for example. The repeater’s frequency and access codes could all be the same with the only difference being the talk group code. It is important to know which time slot the talk group is on, as that must match. Repeaterbook tracks the talk groups available to a repeater. DMR repeaters and networks incorporate a system of “talk groups.” These are simply an ID code transmitted by the radio, that is accepted by the repeater, and retransmitted to other DMR radios on the same channel, and potentially across the Internet to other linked systems. This ID code is a simple number like “310.” In the DMR world, 310 has been given the moniker of “Tac-310.” Any radio that is set to receive Tac-310 on that repeater’s frequency channel will open the speaker and allow the transmission to pass to the end user. Any other radio not monitoring Tac-310 will remain silent. These talk groups are programmed into radios like channels. A repeater could support multiple talk groups and the end-user radio would have to have each of these talk groups programmed into separate memory channels in order to utilize them. Memory slot one could be Tac-310, memory two could be Tac-311, and memory three could be Tac-312, for example. The repeater’s frequency and access codes could all be the same with the only difference being the talk group code. It is important to know which time slot the talk group is on, as that must match. Repeaterbook tracks the talk groups available to a repeater.
 ===== What is a C-Bridge? ===== ===== What is a C-Bridge? =====
-The C-Bridge ​is the secret ​to IPSC (Internet Protocol Site Connect) which involves the linking ​of multiple ​repeaters to a single networkor to multiple networks. The C-Bridge ​is also the source of audio feeds of the various audio streams that make DMR what it is. The C-Bridge ​in essence is part database manager, part master control hub and part gateway. It is responsible for the assignment of what talk groups are available to a particular network; as well as the repeaters attached to that network. ​+There are technically two different uses for a c-bridge. The first one is at the local level to cluster, or connect, upto 15 repeaters into a hub. Repeaterbook simply refers to these as IPSC networks.  
 + 
 +The second use to connect clusters ​of repeaters to additional clusters of repeaters. Repeaterbook tracks this bridge assignmentwhen known. The cBridge ​is also the source of audio feeds of the various audio streams that make DMR what it is. The cBridge ​in essence is part database manager, part master control hub and part gateway. It is responsible for the assignment of what talk groups are available to a particular network; as well as the repeaters attached to that network. ​
 ===== What is a Code Plug? ===== ===== What is a Code Plug? =====
 DMR Radios are configured using “Code Plugs”, which define the repeaters, talk groups, and other settings used by the radio to communicate. Every manufacturer uses their own format, which may or may not be compatible with similar models. Though this model of programming allows a large amount of customization for a given radio, it is also very time intensive – and unlike analog and some digital modes, you must program a DMR radio with a code plug before it will work. DMR Radios are configured using “Code Plugs”, which define the repeaters, talk groups, and other settings used by the radio to communicate. Every manufacturer uses their own format, which may or may not be compatible with similar models. Though this model of programming allows a large amount of customization for a given radio, it is also very time intensive – and unlike analog and some digital modes, you must program a DMR radio with a code plug before it will work.
dmr.txt · Last modified: 2019/12/26 17:41 by KD6KPC